Serving Art Educators
and Students Since 1994


 

Paige Conn's Art Room

Collage Inspired by Romare Bearden - "Visual Jazz"
Fourth Grade Lesson

This lesson was inspired by a lesson by Nancy Walkup in School Arts Magazine. Students watched the video "Visual Jazz" and some classes viewed the more recent video "The Art of Romare Bearden."

The next session, Paige had laid out borrowed instruments and students had the opportunity to move around the room to sketch. (They listened to the CD "Romare Bearden Revealed" throughout the entire project) Mid-way through this session, students had to choose the instrument they wanted to feature in their collage. They were to draw only the silhouette of the instrument considering the size of the black Construction Paper they were to mount it on. Instrument was cut from fadeless paper and positioned where they wanted it to be. Then they were then ready to add details and "pizzazz" to their pieces. Paige unveiled a box of "paper scraps" ordered from Sax (this had all sorts of bright and metallic papers) and the students went wild - all the while considering the elements of design. See works in progress.

 

Romare Bearden collage      Romare Bearden collage      Romare Bearden collage

 

Romare Bearden collage      Romare Bearden collage      Romare Bearden collage

 

Click the images above for larger views

 

Non-Objective/Abstract Artinspired by Wassily Kandinsky
Third Grade Lesson

Students spent the first half of their first session viewing and discussing the work of "The Father of Abstract Art." Paige had ordered a portfolio of Kandinsky's prints and had the students respond to them. With each print, they discussed Line, Shape, Color and Mood. She then shared a much larger print of Farbstudie Quadrate. They went through the same discussion with this. The artists were then told this was going to be the piece from which we would get our inspiration.

I then outlined the standards for this project.

Each artist worked on paper 18 x 24 (46 x 61 cm) - the largest they had ever worked. Each artist prepared a grid with the same number of sections as the Kandinsky (this was not measured - the students were encouraged to use their eye or devise a non-standard unit of measurement). Each artist was required to have at least 2 circles represented in each section. The medium used was oil pastels. An artist could also choose to use watercolor - but watercolor could not touch watercolor, so a mental plan was needed. Watercolor was not used until after the oil pastel coloring was finished.

 

Kandinsky Abstract Pastel      Kandinsky Abstract Pastel      Kandinsky Abstract Pastel

 

Kandinsky Abstract Pastel      Kandinsky Abstract Pastel      Kandinsky Abstract Pastel
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